Human Plastination Exhibit

Human Plastination Exhibit

What is the plastination technique

Plastination is a special technique with which people can preserve biological tissue as it is alive. The high-tech solid preservation method has all the advantages of traditional preservation methods and discards their deficiencies, so it overwhelms all the other methods. In this technique, a vacuum physical process is applied, the water and fat in biological tissue are replaced by high-molecular polymers such as silicone rubber, epoxy resin and polyester resin through an impregnation process. The finished animal specimens are non-toxic, odorless, dry, resilient, portable and durable, without the requirement for special maintenance or protection. In addition, they can not only keep the original shape and appearance of the animals(fur, etc.) but also show their interior structure, vividly presenting the various postures of animals as they are alive.

Human Plastination Exhibit

Human body plastination specimen provided by China plastination company for plastination exhibition and medical education. The development of plastination has opened up new vistas for gross anatomy. In particular, it has led to a major expansion in the range of human anatomic specimens available for teaching and its potential value in research is increasingly being appreciated. More recently, it has burst into the public arena through what has become known as ‘Anatomy Art, as depicted in the von Hagens plastination exhibition.

Human Plastination Exhibit

Human lower limb of Meiwo plastination for body plastination exhibit and anatomy class clearly shows lateral femoral cutaneous nerve, anterior cutaneous branch, rectus femoris, sartorius, musculi adductor longus, saphenous nerve, superficial peroneal nerve, cutaneous dorsalis medialis nerve, nervus cutaneus dorsalis lateralis pedis, superior clunial nerves, inferior cluneal nerves, posterior femoral cutaneous nerve, medial sural cutaneous nerve, lateral sural cutaneous nerve, common peroneal nerve, gastrocnemius, sciatic nerve, biceps femoris, gluteus maximus, etc.